Tagged: technology

The death of journalism – and how to resurrect yourself in the digital age

I will admit I was intrigued when I learned QUT’s propitious Online Journalism students would be graced by the presence of John Grey, the witty and enigmatic up-until-one-month-ago editor (and founder) of couriermail.com.au. Although enlightening, it was also rather frightening. As Grey painted a somewhat bleak, pessimistic future of the journalism industry (“I hold grave concerns about the profession – news organisation’s aren’t looking for quality any more”), timorous-filled-whispers filled the theatre. Not only did Grey succeed at taking the spring out of my step, I could feel the fiery ambition of my fellow budding journalists beginning to fester. Grey failed to instil in me the optimism I had been longing for from the industry.

Does this mean death to journalism? Well, in a way. Not every newspaper will have identical reporters covering the same stories, geographical areas or sub-industries. It simply does not make sense in today’s digital world. Instead, there will be one journalist reporting from Canberra on behalf of all organisations, for example. It will be like one big news wire service. All papers will also share content. Therefore, this will result in more jobs, but for less people. As Grey reiterated, it is “out with the old” and “in with the new” when it comes to changes in journalism styles and skills.

Sure, there will always be demand for jobs within the industry, but these positions will be extremely difficult to score. As Grey said, “…you just need to be a good writer.” So, the ability to write remains the most important skill if you want to become a successful journalist, you ask? Yes, but you must also be versatile and comfortable with a range of content management systems. “You must be able to tell a story in different ways through pictures, video and words. It’s the whole package,” said Grey.

Despite a dramatic rise in the number of citizen journalists and bloggers who are equipped with the technology, facilities and abilities to deliver news, a democracy such as ours will always require “big media organisations” with “deep pockets” to obtain the real facts, said Grey.

I came across this fascinating ’21st Century newsroom model’, which outlines how a news story typically passes through a converged newsroom today. The model suggests speed and depth are the two strengths of online mediums. News organisations now have the ability to distribute and publish information faster than ever before. There’s Twitter, Facebook, moblogs, apps, and the list goes on. Interestingly, Grey stated there is no such thing as an ‘exclusive’ story any more, due to the perils of the Internet. He says a media outlet would be “lucky” to have an exclusive for three minutes. Three minutes!

So, how do you stand out from the crowd? How can you resurrect yourself in the digital age? In her blog, British freelance journalist Lara O’Reilly pinpoints the skills new journalists require if they are to succeed in today’s fast-paced newsrooms:

  • A portfolio showcasing your work
  • Innovative thinking
  • News gathering skills
  • Concise writing style
  • Ability to understand your audience
  • Social media and online tools
  • An interactive blog
  • A network of contacts
  • Layout and design skills
  • Ability to capture video

In sum, new age journalists need every string to their bow, from the fundamentals of writing to new techniques such as layout, design and social media, to resurrect themselves in an industry that is becoming increasingly cutthroat, bloodthirsty and on the cusp of a traditional death.

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Journalism 2.0

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According to a recent World Bank report, more than 75 percent of the population now has access to a mobile phone rather than access to clean water. This disquieting statistic, presented to QUT’s Online Journalism 1 students by the homepage editor of the Courier-Mail, Dave Earley (pictured), epitomises the colossal role new age technology has played in regards to who, what, when, why and how the worldwide population accesses news.

Despite a recent Ipsos/Reuters poll revealing more than 60 percent of the world interconnects via social media outlets, Earley asserted that social media is not (yet) an overwhelming driver of news. And, he was right. Much to my surprise, less than two percent of Twitter’s 100 million active users follow the site often for news.

Interestingly, Earley also pointed out that 36% of adults in the United States obtain their dose of daily news by heading directly to a news outlet’s webpage, whilst 32% get their news by using key word searches through engines such as Google or Bing. Therefore, it is clear consumers are reluctant to access news through a means of engagement, such as clicking through to links that appear throughout feeds. So, why aren’t consumers relying on social media for their daily news information, especially in comparison with accessing news websites or apps directly?

A survey released as part of this year’s annual State of the News Media Report probes news consumption habits on digital devices, including how news consumers use social media. Overall, the study confirms that Facebook and Twitter are now pathways to news, but their roles may not be as influential as initially expected. These findings reveal that social media is not a replacement for traditional news players, rather an additional news pathway.

In sum, despite the creation of revolutionary online media outlets, the traditional players remain the go-to for the vast majority of consumers. However, there is no question that journos in the 21st Century need to jump on the social media bandwagon in order to remain relevant and reliable. Innovative technology, coupled with traditional news values, is the recipe for success in this digital age. It would be foolish to think otherwise.