The one-two punch: integrating social media and radio journalism

This blog entry could solely provide you with ’10 things I bet you didn’t know about Spencer Howson’, because he is one fascinating creature. The 612 ABC Brisbane Breakfast host, who I have longed to meet, loves to tweet. So much so, he in fact admitted to showering and tweeting at the same time. It sounds dangerous, almost life-threatening. Is there some kind of secret AA meeting for those self-obsessed social media addicts? My friends and family often question why I use Twitter, with running commentary like: “What is it?” “What do you do? Treat someone?” “I just don’t get it.” “It’s confusing.” And the list goes on.

But Spencer Howson gets it! He accepts that social media, and Twitter in particular, is a driving force for engaging with, and expanding, your audience. That is just one reason why I find him so fascinating. Not to mention his childhood BFF was Kyle Sandilands. “Who?” You ask. “Surely you couldn’t be talking about THE Kyle Sandilands, outspoken TV and radio personality known for his misdemeanours, outlandish ethical standards and bad boy image.” YES! Him. Hilarious! I just cannot get over it.

Hailed the ‘Breakfast King’, Howson is the top rating brekky presenter in Brisbane, so of course I was excited to hear he would be speaking to QUT’s Online Journalism students. I was like a squealing child at the first sight of candy when I received a notification that the Breakfast King himself replied to my tweet (despite referring to me as ‘crazy’ and ‘mixed-up’):

Anyway, back to the serious side of things. Howson says that radio is only half of his job now – the other half is social media. These days, connection and engagement with listeners is almost 24/7 due to the World Wide Web. Whilst the fate of the print journalism industry lies in the balance, Howson says radio is moving from strength to strength. Twitter enables radio hosts to connect with local communities, whether they are listeners or not, and drive them to the radio station. Interactivity is also faster than ever before, with the ability to receive responses and comments in a matter of seconds. Howson says it’s like reading perennial amounts of letters-to-the-editor. Social media has also enabled radio outlets to partake in photo engagement like never before. In the past, listeners would mail their photos to the station. Now, photo and video content can be shared more often and more freely.

Howson also debated that Twitter is useful in obtaining sources, especially those who may be reluctant to comment on air, and sourcing story ideas. The Oriella PR Network’s Global Digital Journalism Study supports this idea, suggesting that journalists are treating social media channels not only as sources of news, but also as a means of validating stories. Last year, just under half of journalists surveyed said they used Twitter for sourcing stories, and 35% used Facebook in the same way. This year found that 54% of respondents use social media outlets if the source is trusted by the journalist, whilst 45% said they used blogs to source angles for new stories. This highlights the growing use of social media, particularly Twitter, as an essential part of today’s newsgathering process. Interestingly, the graph below shows where journalists worldwide turn when researching a story:

In sum, it is undeniable that social media is the way of the future, not only when it comes to connecting and engaging with your audience, but also sourcing stories and obtaining comments. Social media is also aiding the survival of radio journalism during times when traditional media platforms are struggling to sail the unchartered waters ahead. It seems Howson knows what he’s doing in the Twittersphere.

I will leave you with one last fun fact about Spencer Howson. He writes on fruit. “If you run out of paper, a banana will do,” he says. Personally, I love it.

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